Digital Humanities and me ...

My interest for different languages already started during my time at high school. My main subjects were English and French. After high school I began to study computer science at university. The university offers many courses in various languages and I took many courses, even if they had no relevance for my studies in computer science.

As some complications in the subject of formal theories of information technologies arose, I took the initiative to inscribe to the Joint Bachelor in Computer Science and English. Subsequently, I was continuously in contact with the tools and methods of Digital Humanities, starting with a seminar about corpus linguistics. Furthermore, whenever it was possible to employ the computer to support my work for English at university, I gladly used it. Some applications are the text analysis and interpretation of texts, were digital investigation helps to find relevant passages for the support of argumentation.

The direct influence of Digital Humanities increased, when I was employed as a student assistant for Digital Humanities at university. My work was from then on to explore different tools or even frameworks for digital text and corpus analysis as well as to find solutions for work-flows to digital linguistic tasks. Additionally, it is my task to present and to keep record of those solutions in a form generally comprehensible form. My computer science background is a great foundation for this work and studies in Digital Humanities.

The current focus of my computer sciences studies are data and knowledge engineering, which include subjects as artificial intelligence, natural language processing or machine learning. The interdisciplinary value for the both of my degree programs is tremendous and compensates the initial additional expense in studying something completely different to computer science. Essentially, Digital Humanities as well as literary and linguistic studies provide me the possibility to gain another perspective on the approach of computational text or voice analysis of computer science.

30.10.14 17:38, kommentieren

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Hello world ... it's me Denis!

I am a German-French graduate student of English and Computer Science at the Technical University of Darmstadt. Yes, my name is French, so the French pronunciation would be [dəˈni] for the IPA transcritption or Döní for the German readers. I am currently studying Computer Science with IT-Management and Literary and Linguistic Computing for the Master of science and Master of arts degree. I worked as webmaster and translator for German and French website, and work now as student assistant for Digital Humanities and software developer/web-designer. This blog was started for a course of English for Digital Humanities.

30.10.14 17:36, kommentieren


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